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Hospital-acquired listeriosis linked to a persistently contaminated milkshake machine.

Hospital-acquired listeriosis linked to a persistently contaminated milkshake machine.
Author Information (click to view)

Mazengia E, Kawakami V, Rietberg K, Kay M, Wyman P, Skilton C, Aberra A, Boonyaratanakornkit J, Limaye AP, Pergam SA, Whimbey E, Olsen-Scribner RJ, Duchin JS,


Mazengia E, Kawakami V, Rietberg K, Kay M, Wyman P, Skilton C, Aberra A, Boonyaratanakornkit J, Limaye AP, Pergam SA, Whimbey E, Olsen-Scribner RJ, Duchin JS, (click to view)

Mazengia E, Kawakami V, Rietberg K, Kay M, Wyman P, Skilton C, Aberra A, Boonyaratanakornkit J, Limaye AP, Pergam SA, Whimbey E, Olsen-Scribner RJ, Duchin JS,

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Epidemiology and infection 2017 01 09145(5) 857-863 doi 10.1017/S0950268816003198
Abstract

One case of hospital-acquired listeriosis was linked to milkshakes produced in a commercial-grade shake freezer machine. This machine was found to be contaminated with a strain of Listeria monocytogenes epidemiologically and molecularly linked to a contaminated pasteurized, dairy-based ice cream product at the same hospital a year earlier, despite repeated cleaning and sanitizing. Healthcare facilities should be aware of the potential for prolonged Listeria contamination of food service equipment. In addition, healthcare providers should consider counselling persons who have an increased risk for Listeria infections regarding foods that have caused Listeria infections. The prevalence of persistent Listeria contamination of commercial-grade milkshake machines in healthcare facilities and the risk associated with serving dairy-based ice cream products to hospitalized patients at increased risk for invasive L. monocytogenes infections should be further evaluated.

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