Advertisement

 

 

Hospital-acquired pressure injuries: The significance of the advanced practice registered nurse’s role in a community hospital.

Hospital-acquired pressure injuries: The significance of the advanced practice registered nurse’s role in a community hospital.
Author Information (click to view)

Irvin C, Sedlak E, Walton C, Collier S, Bernhofer EI,


Irvin C, Sedlak E, Walton C, Collier S, Bernhofer EI, (click to view)

Irvin C, Sedlak E, Walton C, Collier S, Bernhofer EI,

Advertisement
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners 2017 02 08() doi 10.1002/2327-6924.12440
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE
Hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPIs) continue to be a persistent problem in the acute care arena. The purpose of this retrospective quality improvement study was to examine if the introduction of nurse practitioners (NPs), as wound care consultants (WCCs), without other interventions, impacted the HAPI rates in a community hospital.

METHODS
A retrospective, comparison design was used; 48 months of HAPI data (May 2010-2014) reported on the monthly National Database for Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) survey was abstracted from hospital records. Data included the assessment of 10,752 patients and were divided into two groups for comparison: 24 months before and 24 months after NP hiring.

CONCLUSIONS
There was a strong, inverse correlation between the presence of NPs and number of patients with HAPIs (r = -0.73, p < .01), indicating that HAPI rates were significantly lower after NPs took on the role of WCCs. The odds of a HAPI occurring following introduction of the NP WCCs were 20% of the odds in the previous years. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE
Study findings suggest that NPs assuming a leadership role as WCCs may be instrumental in decreasing HAPI rates.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

6 + eleven =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]