Advertisement

 

 

Host genetics contributes to the effectiveness of dendritic cell-based HIV immunotherapy.

Host genetics contributes to the effectiveness of dendritic cell-based HIV immunotherapy.
Author Information (click to view)

Reis EC, da Silva LT, da Silva WC, Rios A, Duarte AJ, Oshiro TM, Crovella S, Pontillo A,


Reis EC, da Silva LT, da Silva WC, Rios A, Duarte AJ, Oshiro TM, Crovella S, Pontillo A, (click to view)

Reis EC, da Silva LT, da Silva WC, Rios A, Duarte AJ, Oshiro TM, Crovella S, Pontillo A,

Advertisement

Human vaccines & immunotherapeutics 2018 04 11() 1-21 doi 10.1080/21645515.2018.1463942

Abstract

Systems biological analysis has recently revealed how innate immune variants as well as gut microbiota impact the individual response to immunization. HIV-infected (HIV+) patients have a worse response rate after standard vaccinations, possibly due to the immune exhaustion, increased gut permeability and microbial translocation. In the last decade, dendritic cells (DC)-based immunotherapy has been proposed as an alternative approach to control HIV plasma viral load, however clinical trials showed a heterogeneity of immunization response. Hypothesizing that host genetics may importantly affects the outcome of immunotherapy in HIV+ patients, genetic polymorphisms’ distribution and gene expression modulation were analyzed in a phase I/II clinical trial of DC-based immunotherapy according to immunization response, and quality of vaccine product (DC). Polymorphisms in genes previously associated with progression of HIV infection to AIDS (i.e.: PARD3B, CCL5) contribute to a better response to immunotherapy in HIV+ individuals, possibly through a systemic effect on host immune system, but also directly on vaccine product. Genes expression profile after immunization correlates with different degrees of immune chronic activation/exhaustion of HIV+ patients (i.e. PD1, IL7RA, EOMES), but also with anti-viral response and DC quality (i.e.: APOBEC3G, IL8, PPIA), suggested that an incompetent individual would have a better vaccine response. These findings showed once more that host genetics can affect the response to DC-based immunotherapy in HIV+ individuals, contributing to the heterogeneity of response observed in concluded trials; and it can be used as predictor of immunization success.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

thirteen − 5 =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]