Advertisement

 

 

HPV vaccine acceptability in high-risk Greek men.

HPV vaccine acceptability in high-risk Greek men.
Author Information (click to view)

Hoefer L, Tsikis S, Bethimoutis G, Nicolaidou E, Paparizos V, Antoniou C, Kanelleas A, Chardalias L, Stavropoulos GE, Schneider J, Charnot-Katsikas A,


Hoefer L, Tsikis S, Bethimoutis G, Nicolaidou E, Paparizos V, Antoniou C, Kanelleas A, Chardalias L, Stavropoulos GE, Schneider J, Charnot-Katsikas A, (click to view)

Hoefer L, Tsikis S, Bethimoutis G, Nicolaidou E, Paparizos V, Antoniou C, Kanelleas A, Chardalias L, Stavropoulos GE, Schneider J, Charnot-Katsikas A,

Advertisement
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Human vaccines & immunotherapeutics 2017 09 22() 0 doi 10.1080/21645515.2017.1379640

Abstract
BACKGROUND
HPV is associated with malignancy in men, yet there is a lack of data on HPV knowledge, vaccine acceptability, and factors affecting vaccine acceptability in Greek men. This study aims to identify determinants of knowledge and willingness to vaccinate against HPV among high-risk Greek men.

METHODS
Men (n = 298) between the ages of 18 and 55 were enrolled from the STI and HIV clinics at "Andreas Syggros" Hospital in Athens, Greece from July-October 2015. Participants completed a survey on demographics, economic factors, sexual history, HPV knowledge, and vaccine acceptability.

RESULTS
The majority of participants were younger than 40 (76.6%) and unmarried (84.6%). Our sample was 31.2% MSM (men who have sex with men), and 20.1% were HIV-positive. Most participants (>90%) were aware that HPV is highly prevalent in both men and women; however, fewer identified that HPV causes cancers in both sexes (68%) and that vaccination protects men and women (67%). Amongst participants, 76.7% were willing to vaccinate themselves against HPV, 71.4% an adolescent son, and 69.3% an adolescent daughter. HIV-positive men were more likely to be willing to vaccinate themselves (OR 2.83, p = .015), a son (OR 3.3, p = .015) or a daughter (3.01, p = .020). Higher income levels were associated with increased willingness to vaccinate oneself (OR 1.32, p = .027), a son (1.33, p = .032) or daughter (1.34, p = .027).

CONCLUSIONS
Although there is a HPV knowledge gap, HPV vaccine acceptability is high despite lack of vaccine promotion to Greek men. Future studies should include lower-risk men to adequately inform public health efforts.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

12 + 2 =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]