Advertisement

 

 

Human hepatocyte depletion in the presence of HIV-1 infection in dual reconstituted humanized mice.

Human hepatocyte depletion in the presence of HIV-1 infection in dual reconstituted humanized mice.
Author Information (click to view)

Dagur RS, Wang W, Cheng Y, Makarov E, Ganesan M, Suemizu H, Gebhart CL, Gorantla S, Osna N, Poluektova LY,


Dagur RS, Wang W, Cheng Y, Makarov E, Ganesan M, Suemizu H, Gebhart CL, Gorantla S, Osna N, Poluektova LY, (click to view)

Dagur RS, Wang W, Cheng Y, Makarov E, Ganesan M, Suemizu H, Gebhart CL, Gorantla S, Osna N, Poluektova LY,

Advertisement

Biology open 2018 02 137(2) pii 10.1242/bio.029785

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection impairs liver function, and liver diseases have become a leading cause of morbidity in infected patients. The immunopathology of liver damage caused by HIV-1 remains unclear. We used chimeric mice dually reconstituted with a human immune system and hepatocytes to address the relevance of the model to pathobiology questions related to human hepatocyte survival in the presence of systemic infection. TK-NOG males were transplanted with mismatched human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and hepatocytes, human albumin concentration and the presence of human immune cells in blood were monitored for hepatocytes and immune reconstitution, and mice were infected with HIV-1. HIV-1-infected animals showed a decline in human albumin concentration with a significant reduction in percentage of human hepatocytes compared to uninfected mice. The decrease in human albumin levels correlated with a decline in CD4cells in the liver and with an increase in HIV-1 viral load. HIV-1 infection elicited proinflammatory response in the immunological milieu of the liver in HIV-infected mice compared to uninfected animals, as determined by upregulation of IL23, CXCL10 and multiple toll-like receptor expression. The inflammatory reaction associated with HIV-1 infectioncould contribute to the depletion and dysfunction of hepatocytes. The dual reconstituted TK-NOG mouse model is a feasible platform to investigate hepatocyte-related HIV-1 immunopathogenesis.This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

3 × one =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]