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Immune dysregulation in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

Immune dysregulation in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.
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Moalem-Taylor G, Baharuddin B, Bennett B, Krishnan AV, Huynh W, Kiernan MC, Shin-Yi Lin C, Shulruf B, Keoshkerian E, Cameron B, Lloyd A,


Moalem-Taylor G, Baharuddin B, Bennett B, Krishnan AV, Huynh W, Kiernan MC, Shin-Yi Lin C, Shulruf B, Keoshkerian E, Cameron B, Lloyd A, (click to view)

Moalem-Taylor G, Baharuddin B, Bennett B, Krishnan AV, Huynh W, Kiernan MC, Shin-Yi Lin C, Shulruf B, Keoshkerian E, Cameron B, Lloyd A,

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Scientific reports 2017 08 157(1) 8218 doi 10.1038/s41598-017-08123-6
Abstract

Peripheral immunity plays a key role in maintaining homeostasis and conferring crucial neuroprotective effects on the injured nervous system, while at the same time may contribute to increased vulnerability to neuropathic pain. Little is known about the reciprocal relationship between entrapment neuropathy and peripheral immunity. This study investigated immune profile in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), the most prevalent entrapment neuropathy. All patients exhibited neurophysiological abnormalities in the median nerve, with the majority reporting neuropathic pain symptoms. We found a significant increase in serum CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL10 and VEGF, and in CD4+ central and effector memory T cells in CTS patients, as compared to healthy controls. CCL5 and VEGF were identified as having the highest power to discriminate between patients and controls. Interestingly, and contrary to the prevailing view of CCL5 as a pro-nociceptive factor, the level of circulating CCL5 was inversely correlated with neuropathic pain intensity and median nerve motor latency. In contrast, the level of central memory T cells was positively associated with abnormal neurophysiological findings. These results suggest that entrapment neuropathy is associated with adaptive changes in the homeostasis of memory T cells and an increase in systemic inflammatory modulating cytokines/chemokines, which potentially regulate neuropathic symptoms.

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