For a study, researchers sought to see if seasonal influenza vaccination was linked to a lower risk of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events and if the latest cardiovascular outcome trial results were consistent with previous outcomes, using an updated meta-analysis. About 9,001 patients were included in 6 published RCTs (mean age, 65.5 years; 42.5% women; 52.3% with a cardiac history). Overall, influenza vaccination was linked to a decreased risk of composite cardiovascular events (3.6% vs 5.4%; risk ratio, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.53-0.83; P<.001). Patients with recent acute coronary syndrome (ACS) (RR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.41-0.75) and those without recent ACS (RR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.68-1.47) had a treatment interaction (P for interaction=.02). A treatment interaction was found between patients with recent ACS (RR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.23-0.85) and those without recent ACS (RR, 1.45; 95% CI, 0.84-2.50) (P for interaction=.006), while 1.7% of vaccine recipients died of cardiovascular causes compared to 2.5% of placebo or control recipients (RR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.42-1.30; P=.29). In the investigation, influenza vaccination was linked to a 34% reduction in the risk of significant adverse cardiovascular events and a 45% reduction in the risk of recent ACS. Given the threat of influenza to public health during the COVID-19 pandemic, it was critical to educate high-risk individuals about the cardiovascular benefits of the influenza vaccine.

Source:jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2791733