This is a Cross-sectional data analysis study.
Our goal was to examine the association between internet use habits and influenza vaccination uptake using a nationally representative sample of non-institutionalised US adults.
This is a Cross-sectional data analysis study.
We pooled data from seven years (2012-2018) of the National Health Interview Survey for secondary data analysis (N = 220,570). We estimated influenza vaccination uptake among different population groups. We performed multivariable logistic regression models with influenza vaccination uptake as a dichotomous dependent variable.
Influenza vaccination uptake was highest among those who used the internet for formal health information and communication with a provider (55.1%), and lowest among those internet users who did not use the internet for any type of formal or informal health information and communication (35.6%). About 45.2% of non-internet users received an influenza vaccination during the last 12 months. After controlling for covariates, compared with those who did not use the internet, adults who used the internet for formal health information and communication with providers were 1.52 times more likely to uptake an influenza vaccine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.52; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.45-1.59). Internet users who did not use the internet for any health information were significantly less likely to get vaccinated against influenza (OR = 0.92; 95% CI = 0.88-0.96).
It appears that internet use habit impacts influenza vaccination uptake. Internet users who do not use the internet for any formal or informal health information tend to have lower rates of influenza vaccine uptake than other groups. Customised interventions for different populations based on their internet use habits can help increase the national influenza vaccination rate and other immunisation efforts for contagious diseases.

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