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July 2017 Briefing – Critical Care

July 2017 Briefing – Critical Care
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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Critical Care for July 2017. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

2016 Saw Increase in Number of Physicians Since 2010 Census

THURSDAY, July 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Census reports have demonstrated an increase in the number of physicians and in the actively licensed U.S. physician-to-population ratio from 2010 to 2016, according to a study published in the Journal of Medical Regulation.

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Benefit of Newer NICU Ventilation Strategies Questioned

THURSDAY, July 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) — From 1991 to 2005, there was an increase in the duration of assisted ventilation among survivors of extremely preterm birth, but no improvement in lung function in childhood, according to a study published in the July 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Memantine Linked to Lower Neuron-Specific Enolase in TBI

WEDNESDAY, July 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) — For patients with moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI), memantine is associated with reduced neuronal damage, as assessed by serum levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), according to a study published online July 19 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Many With Cancer Hospitalized, Undergo Imaging at End of Life

WEDNESDAY, July 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) — About half of cancer patients are hospitalized and undergo at least one imaging scan at the end of life, according to a study published online July 24 in the Journal of Oncology Practice.

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Average Increase in Physician Compensation 2.9% in 2016

MONDAY, July 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) — The AMGA 2017 Medical Group Compensation and Productivity Survey reports that 77 percent of physician specialties experienced increases in compensation in 2016, with an overall weighted average increase of 2.9 percent.

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fMRI, EEG May Detect Consciousness in TBI Patients

FRIDAY, July 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) may be able to detect consciousness in patients with severe traumatic brain injury who appear unconscious in the intensive care unit (ICU), according to a study published online July 20 in Brain.

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FDA Approves First Neonatal MRI Device

FRIDAY, July 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) — The first magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) device designed specifically for neonatal brain and head imaging in intensive care units has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Educational Intervention Doesn’t Up Hand, Stethoscope Hygiene

FRIDAY, July 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) — An intervention including education is not associated with an increased rate of hand hygiene or stethoscope hygiene, according to a study published in the July 1 issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Few Patients Receive Rx for Smoking Cessation Meds After MI

FRIDAY, July 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Among older patients in community practice, the use of smoking cessation medications (SCMs) is low after myocardial infarction (MI), according to a study published online July 19 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Reducing Hospital Readmissions Doesn’t Up Mortality Rates

WEDNESDAY, July 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Reducing hospital readmission rates for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia didn’t increase mortality rates, according to a study published in the July 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Survival Feasible Post Acute Liver Failure Secondary to Amiodarone

WEDNESDAY, July 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) — In a report published online July 16 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics, a case of survival after acute liver failure secondary to amiodarone administration is described.

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Post-Op Pain May Often Be Underrated by Inpatient Staff

WEDNESDAY, July 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Postoperative pain is frequently underrated when assessed by nursing staff on wards, according to a study published online July 14 in PAIN Practice.

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Patient-Centered Communication Could Help Reduce Burnout

MONDAY, July 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Better patient-physician communication can improve care and reduce burnout, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Higher Inpatient Spending Tied to Better Outcomes

FRIDAY, July 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Investing more in inpatient care relative to longer-term nursing facilities may help reduce mortality rates, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Health Economics.

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Meds + Risk Factors Contribute to QTc Interval Lengthening

FRIDAY, July 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) — In combination with risk factors, QTc interval-prolonging medications (QTPMs) are associated with greater QTc lengthening than QTPMs alone, according to a study published online July 10 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Early Career Burnout Can Be Contagious Via Social Networks

FRIDAY, July 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) — For early career teachers (ECTs), social network members’ burnout levels are associated with increased burnout levels, according to a study published in the August issue of Teaching and Teacher Education.

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Medicaid Enrollees Are Satisfied With Their Health Care

WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Medicaid enrollees are largely satisfied with their health care, and most are able to access the care they need when they need it, according to a research letter published online July 10 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Health Service Use Unchanged From 1996-1997 to 2011-2012

TUESDAY, July 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Utilization of health services was largely unchanged from 1996-1997 to 2011-2012, but expenditures increased, according to a study published in the July/August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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American Adults Without Health Insurance Rises by Two Million

TUESDAY, July 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) — The number of American adults without health insurance has increased by about two million so far this year, according to a new Gallup-Sharecare Well-Being Index poll.

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No Advance Directives for Almost Two-Thirds of U.S. Population

FRIDAY, July 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) — An estimated two of three people in the United States have not completed an advanced directive, according to a review published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

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Traumatic Brain Injury May Up Later Risk of Dementia

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) — A severe head injury, especially during middle age, could dramatically increase the risk for developing dementia later in life, according to research published online July 5 in PLOS Medicine.

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Market Competition Linked to Change in Generic Drug Prices

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Market competition levels are associated with changes in the price of generic drugs, according to a study published online July 4 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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From 2001 to 2012, Incidence of CDI, Multiply Recurrent CDI Up

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) — The annual incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and multiply recurrent CDI (mrCDI) increased from 2001 to 2012, according to a study published online July 4 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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AMA: Doctors Should Make Sure Their Online Info Is Accurate

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) — In a technologically advanced society, physicians need to take advantage of the internet to reach patients and exercise caution in their online presence, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Pre-, Post-Op C-Reactive Protein Levels Tied to Delirium

WEDNESDAY, July 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) — For older adults undergoing major noncardiac surgery, preoperative and postoperative day 2 (POD2) C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are associated with the incidence, duration, and severity of delirium, according to a study published online May 26 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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