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Key Programme Science lessons from an HIV prevention ‘Learning Site’ for sex workers in Mombasa, Kenya.

Key Programme Science lessons from an HIV prevention ‘Learning Site’ for sex workers in Mombasa, Kenya.
Author Information (click to view)

McClarty LM, Bhattacharjee P, Isac S, Emmanuel F, Kioko J, Njiraini M, Gichangi P, Okoth CD, Musimbi-Mbole J, Blanchard JF, Moses S, Muysyoki H, Becker ML,


McClarty LM, Bhattacharjee P, Isac S, Emmanuel F, Kioko J, Njiraini M, Gichangi P, Okoth CD, Musimbi-Mbole J, Blanchard JF, Moses S, Muysyoki H, Becker ML, (click to view)

McClarty LM, Bhattacharjee P, Isac S, Emmanuel F, Kioko J, Njiraini M, Gichangi P, Okoth CD, Musimbi-Mbole J, Blanchard JF, Moses S, Muysyoki H, Becker ML,

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Sexually transmitted infections 2017 12 14() pii 10.1136/sextrans-2017-053228

Abstract
OBJECTIVES
In 2013, Kenya’s National AIDS and STI Control Programme established a Learning Site (LS) in Mombasa County to support and strengthen capacity for HIV prevention programming within organisations working with sex workers. A defining feature of LS was the use of a Programme Science approach throughout its development and implementation. We provide an overview of the key components of LS, present findings from 23 months of programme monitoring data, and highlight key Programme Science lessons from its implementation and monitoring.

METHODS
Routine monitoring data collected from September 2013 through July 2015 are presented. Individual-level service utilisation data were collected monthly and indicators of interest were analysed over time to illustrate trends in enrolment, programme coverage and service utilisation among sex workers in Mombasa County.

RESULTS
Over the monitoring period, outreach programme enrolment occurred rapidly; condom distribution targets were met consistently; rates of STI screening remained high and diagnoses declined; and reporting of and response to violent incidents increased. At the same time, enrolment in LS clinics was relatively low among female sex workers, and HIV testing at LS was low among both female and male sex workers.

CONCLUSION
Lessons learnt from operationalising the Programme Science framework through the Mombasa LS can inform the development and implementation of similar LS in different geographical and epidemiological contexts. Importantly, meaningful involvement of sex workers in the design, implementation and monitoring processes ensures that overall programme performance is optimised in the context of local, ‘on-the-ground’ realities. Additionally, learnings from LS highlight the importance of introducing enhanced monitoring and evaluations systems into complex programmes to better understand and explain programme dynamics over time.

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