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Laparoscopic treatment of abdominal unicentric castleman’s disease: a case report and literature review.

Laparoscopic treatment of abdominal unicentric castleman’s disease: a case report and literature review.
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Bracale U, Pacelli F, Milone M, Bracale UM, Sodo M, Merola G, Troiani T, Di Salvo E,


Bracale U, Pacelli F, Milone M, Bracale UM, Sodo M, Merola G, Troiani T, Di Salvo E, (click to view)

Bracale U, Pacelli F, Milone M, Bracale UM, Sodo M, Merola G, Troiani T, Di Salvo E,

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BMC surgery 2017 04 1217(1) 38 doi 10.1186/s12893-017-0238-6
Abstract
BACKGROUND
Castleman’s disease is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown etiology that most commonly presents as a mediastinal nodal mass. It is exceptionally uncommon for Castleman’s disease to present in the mesentery and, only 53 cases have ever been described in the literature. Standard treatment for this lymphoproliferative disorder involving a single node is a complete "en bloc" surgical resection which has proven to be a curative approach in almost all cases without recurrence after 20 years of follow up. All 53 reported cases of mesenteric Castleman’s disease, except one, were treated with laparotomy.

CASE PRESENTATION
We report on a case of mesenteric Castleman’s disease localized in the mesentery which is the second reported case if its kind and was treated by a laparoscopic-assisted procedure. Our female patient had an uneventful postoperative course and was discharged in the 5(th) post-operative day. No signs of recurrence were present as evidenced by physical examination and total body CT scan 24 months after the operation. We compare our case with the other reported cases in which Castleman’s disease presented as an isolated mass in the abdomen.

CONCLUSION
Although a rare disease, Unicentric Castleman’s disease should always be considered when a solid asymptomatic abdominal mass is occasionally presented. The laparoscopic approach (LA) allows for the achievement of better results than open surgery, including a reduction in postoperative pain and length of hospital stay. In cases of masses of an uncertain nature, LA must be considered the last diagnostic tool and the first treatment one.

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