The aim of the study was to assess whether the level of physical activity in daily life in previously sedentary adults had been sustained 7 years beyond a 1-year supervised walking program. One hundred ten participants (63 females, 57.5 ± 8.4 years; 47 males, 66.4 ± 7.9 years) were recalled and assessed for physical activity in daily life, weight, body mass index, blood pressure, and walking speed. Fifty-nine percentage of the participants measured met and exceeded the World Health Organization physical activity guidelines (Group 1), while 41% did not (Group 2). In both groups, we observed a significant decrease of weight (72.0 ± 14.0 kg vs. 69.7 ± 14.0 kg in Group 1; 77.4 ± 19.5 kg vs. 75.4 ± 18.6 kg in Group 2) and body mass index (25.9 ± 3.7 vs. 25.1 ± 3.9 in Group 1; 27.9 ± 5.6 vs. 27.2 ± 5.4 in Group 2). Group 1 showed a significant increase in walking speed (5.8 ± 0.7 km/hr vs. 6.2 ± 0.8 km/hr), while systolic pressure did not change from the baseline. In Group 2, systolic pressure significantly increased (131.3 ± 13.5 mmHg vs. 138.0 ± 15.5 mmHg), while walking speed did not change. A guided walking program seems to have been effective in educating sedentary people to remain physically active over time.