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Management of Hypertension in the Elderly and Frail Elderly.

Management of Hypertension in the Elderly and Frail Elderly.
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Ferri C, Ferri L, Desideri G,


Ferri C, Ferri L, Desideri G, (click to view)

Ferri C, Ferri L, Desideri G,

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High blood pressure & cardiovascular prevention : the official journal of the Italian Society of Hypertension 2017 02 08() doi 10.1007/s40292-017-0185-4
Abstract

An elevated systolic but not diastolic blood pressure level represents a common finding in elderly patients and is associated with an increased risk for developing coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral artery disease, progressive cognitive decline and renal failure. Although less frequently, elderly patients manifest not only with systolic but also diastolic hypertension. Also in this case, the elderly patient will present an increased risk for developing hypertension-related abnormalities. Based on several trials conducted in patients ≥65 years and one single trial in patients ≥80 years the most recent European guidelines recommend antihypertensive treatment in elderly hypertensive patients with a systolic blood pressure ≥60 mmHg, with a systolic target between 140 and 150 mmHg. In fit elderly patients <80 years treatment may be considered at a systolic level ≥140 mmHg with a target SBP <140 mmHg if treatment is well tolerated. Despite of the above, at least three issues related to antihypertensive drug treatment in aged individuals are still debated, particularly after the publication of a recent large scale clinical trial that included also 2.636 patients ≥75 years and a study in nursing home residents ≥80 years, i.e. the frailest oldest patients: (1) the blood pressure threshold at which antihypertensive drug should be initiated, (2) the blood pressure targets of the therapeutic intervention, and (3) the approach to frail elderly hypertensive patients. This review will critically review the evidence available so far on these important issues as well as the position of current guidelines and consensus statements.

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