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Mask pressure effects on the nasal bridge during short-term noninvasive ventilation.

Mask pressure effects on the nasal bridge during short-term noninvasive ventilation.
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Brill AK, Pickersgill R, Moghal M, Morrell MJ, Simonds AK,


Brill AK, Pickersgill R, Moghal M, Morrell MJ, Simonds AK, (click to view)

Brill AK, Pickersgill R, Moghal M, Morrell MJ, Simonds AK,

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ERJ open research 2018 04 094(2) pii 00168-2017
Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the influence of different masks, ventilator settings and body positions on the pressure exerted on the nasal bridge by the mask and subjective comfort during noninvasive ventilation (NIV). We measured the pressure over the nasal bridge in 20 healthy participants receiving NIV four different NIV masks (three oronasal masks, one nasal mask) at three different ventilator settings and in the seated or supine position. Objective pressure measurements were obtained with an I-Scan pressure-mapping system. Subjective comfort of the mask fit was assessed with a visual analogue scale. The masks exerted mean pressures between 47.6±29 mmHg and 91.9±42.4 mmHg on the nasal bridge. In the supine position, the pressure was lower in all masks (57.1±31.9 mmHg supine, 63.9±37.3 mmHg seated; p<0.001). With oronasal masks, a change of inspiratory positive airway pressure (IPAP) did not influence the objective pressure over the nasal bridge. Subjective discomfort was associated with higher IPAP and positively correlated with the pressure on the skin. Objective measurement of pressure on the skin during mask fitting might be helpful for mask selection. Mask fitting in the supine position should be considered in the clinical routine.

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