Advertisement

 

 

Maternal Antibody Responses and Nonprimary Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection of HIV-1-Exposed Infants.

Maternal Antibody Responses and Nonprimary Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection of HIV-1-Exposed Infants.
Author Information (click to view)

Bialas KM, Westreich D, Cisneros de la Rosa E, Nelson CS, Kauvar LM, Fu TM, Permar SR,


Bialas KM, Westreich D, Cisneros de la Rosa E, Nelson CS, Kauvar LM, Fu TM, Permar SR, (click to view)

Bialas KM, Westreich D, Cisneros de la Rosa E, Nelson CS, Kauvar LM, Fu TM, Permar SR,

Advertisement

The Journal of infectious diseases 2016 10 20214(12) 1916-1923

Abstract

Risk of congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) transmission is highly dependent on the presence of preexisting maternal immunity, with the lowest rates observed in CMV-seroimmune populations. Among infants of CMV-seroimmune women, those who are exposed to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have an increased risk of acquiring cCMV infection as compared to HIV-unexposed infants. To better understand the risk factors of nonprimary cCMV transmission in HIV-infected women, we performed a case-control study in which CMV-specific plasma antibody responses from 19 CMV-transmitting and 57 CMV-nontransmitting women with chronic CMV/HIV coinfection were evaluated for the ability to predict the risk of cCMV infection. Primary multivariable conditional logistic regression analysis revealed an association between epithelial-tropic CMV neutralizing titers and a reduced risk of cCMV transmission (odds ratio [OR], 0.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], .03-.93; P = .04), although this effect was not significant following correction for multiple comparisons (false-discovery rate, 0.12). Exploratory analysis of the CMV specificity of plasma antibodies revealed that immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses against the glycoprotein B (gB) neutralizing epitope AD-2 had a borderline association with low risk of transmission (OR, 0.72; 95% CI, .51-1.00; P = .05), although this was not confirmed in a post hoc plasma anti-AD-2 IgG blocking assay. Our data suggest that maternal neutralizing antibody responses may play a role in protection against cCMV in HIV/CMV-coinfected populations.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

five × 3 =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]