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Metabolic Effects of Glucose-Fructose Co-Ingestion Compared to Glucose Alone during Exercise in Type 1 Diabetes.

Metabolic Effects of Glucose-Fructose Co-Ingestion Compared to Glucose Alone during Exercise in Type 1 Diabetes.
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Bally L, Kempf P, Zueger T, Speck C, Pasi N, Ciller C, Feller K, Loher H, Rosset R, Wilhelm M, Boesch C, Buehler T, Dokumaci AS, Tappy L, Stettler C,


Bally L, Kempf P, Zueger T, Speck C, Pasi N, Ciller C, Feller K, Loher H, Rosset R, Wilhelm M, Boesch C, Buehler T, Dokumaci AS, Tappy L, Stettler C, (click to view)

Bally L, Kempf P, Zueger T, Speck C, Pasi N, Ciller C, Feller K, Loher H, Rosset R, Wilhelm M, Boesch C, Buehler T, Dokumaci AS, Tappy L, Stettler C,

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Nutrients 2017 02 219(2) pii E164
Abstract

This paper aims to compare the metabolic effects of glucose-fructose co-ingestion (GLUFRU) with glucose alone (GLU) in exercising individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Fifteen male individuals with type 1 diabetes (HbA1c 7.0% ± 0.6% (53 ± 7 mmol/mol)) underwent a 90 min iso-energetic continuous cycling session at 50% VO2max while ingesting combined glucose-fructose (GLUFRU) or glucose alone (GLU) to maintain stable glycaemia without insulin adjustment. GLUFRU and GLU were labelled with (13)C-fructose and (13)C-glucose, respectively. Metabolic assessments included measurements of hormones and metabolites, substrate oxidation, and stable isotopes. Exogenous carbohydrate requirements to maintain stable glycaemia were comparable between GLUFRU and GLU (p = 0.46). Fat oxidation was significantly higher (5.2 ± 0.2 vs. 2.6 ± 1.2 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1), p < 0.001) and carbohydrate oxidation lower (18.1 ± 0.8 vs. 24.5 ± 0.8 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1)p < 0.001) in GLUFRU compared to GLU, with decreased muscle glycogen oxidation in GLUFRU (10.2 ± 0.9 vs. 17.5 ± 1.0 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1), p < 0.001). Lactate levels were higher (2.2 ± 0.2 vs. 1.8 ± 0.1 mmol/L, p = 0.012) in GLUFRU, with comparable counter-regulatory hormones between GLUFRU and GLU (p > 0.05 for all). Glucose and insulin levels, and total glucose appearance and disappearance were comparable between interventions. Glucose-fructose co-ingestion may have a beneficial impact on fuel metabolism in exercising individuals with type 1 diabetes without insulin adjustment, by increasing fat oxidation whilst sparing glycogen.

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