Congenital microcoria (MCOR) is an eye anomaly characterized by a pupil with diameter below 2 mm, and is caused by underdevelopment or absence of the dilator muscle of the pupil. Two types have been described: a recessive, syndromic (Pierson syndrome OMIM 609049) and a dominant, isolated form (MCOR syndrome OMIM 156600). Fares-Taie and colleagues described inherited microdeletions in chromosome band 13q32.1 segregating with dominant microcoria in several families. The GPR180 gene is located within the smallest commonly deleted region and encodes a G protein-coupled receptor involved in smooth muscle cells growth. We here describe a patient with isolated, non-syndromic MCOR. The patient presented with a blue iris and small pupils, non-reactive to cycloplegic agents. Her mother had a milder ocular phenotype, namely a blue iris with hypoplastic crypts and mild myopia. We present a detailed clinical examination and follow up. DNA from the index patient was analyzed for the presence of chromosomal imbalances using molecular karyotyping. The genetic test revealed a small duplication of chromosome band 13q32.1. The duplication affected a 289 kb region, encompassing 11 genes including GPR180. Interestingly, the patient displays only MCOR in contrast to patients with the reciprocal deletion who present with MCOR and iridocorneal angle dysgenesis. This genetic anomaly was inherited from the mother who carries the duplication in mosaic form, which should be considered when offering genetic counselling. In summary, we describe the first 13q32.1 duplication encompassing GPR180 associated with MCOR.
Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.