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Mixed Viral Infections of the Respiratory Tract; an Epidemiological Study During Consecutive Winter Seasons.

Mixed Viral Infections of the Respiratory Tract; an Epidemiological Study During Consecutive Winter Seasons.
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Antalis E, Oikonomopoulou Z, Kottaridi C, Kossyvakis A, Spathis A, Magkana M, Katsouli A, Tsagris V, Papaevangelou V, Mentis A, Tsiodras S,


Antalis E, Oikonomopoulou Z, Kottaridi C, Kossyvakis A, Spathis A, Magkana M, Katsouli A, Tsagris V, Papaevangelou V, Mentis A, Tsiodras S, (click to view)

Antalis E, Oikonomopoulou Z, Kottaridi C, Kossyvakis A, Spathis A, Magkana M, Katsouli A, Tsagris V, Papaevangelou V, Mentis A, Tsiodras S,

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Journal of medical virology 2017 12 15() doi 10.1002/jmv.25006
Abstract

Introduction The current study aimed to describe the molecular epidemiology of mixed respiratory viral infections during consecutive winter seasons in a tertiary care hospital. Methods Patients with symptoms of respiratory tract infection were evaluated during the 2009-2011 and 2013-15 winter seasons. A clinical microarray technique was used for viral detection. Clinical and epidemiological data were correlated with mixed viral detection and the need for hospitalization. Results In 332 out of 604 (54.4%) evaluated patients (17.6% children) a respiratory virus was identified. Mixed viral infections were diagnosed in 68/332 (20.5%) patients with virus detection (66.2% mixed Influenza-RSV infections). Mixed viral infections were more commonly detected in children (OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.9-5.6, p < 0.01) and patients with comorbidities. In logistic regression analyses, mixed viral infections were associated with younger age (mean age 30.4 years vs. 41.8 years, p ≤ 0.001) and increased rates of fever (OR: 2.7; 95% CI 1.04-7.2, p < 0.05) but no adverse outcomes or increased rates of hospitalization. Conclusions High rates of mixed viral infections were noted during all winter seasons (especially Influenza and RSV) and were more common in younger patients. The clinical significance of mixed respiratory viral infection needs further elucidation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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