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Molecular characterization of human anti-hinge antibodies derived from single cell cloning of normal human B cells.

Molecular characterization of human anti-hinge antibodies derived from single cell cloning of normal human B cells.
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Huang T, Mathieu M, Lee S, Wang X, Kee YS, Bevers JJ, Ciferri C, Estavez A, Wong M, Chiang NY, Nakamura G, Brezski RJ,


Huang T, Mathieu M, Lee S, Wang X, Kee YS, Bevers JJ, Ciferri C, Estavez A, Wong M, Chiang NY, Nakamura G, Brezski RJ, (click to view)

Huang T, Mathieu M, Lee S, Wang X, Kee YS, Bevers JJ, Ciferri C, Estavez A, Wong M, Chiang NY, Nakamura G, Brezski RJ,

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The Journal of biological chemistry 2017 11 30() pii jbc.RA117.000165
Abstract

Anti-hinge antibodies (AHAs) are an autoantibody subclass that, following proteolytic cleavage, recognize cryptic epitopes exposed in the hinge regions of immunoglobulins (Igs) and do not bind to the intact Ig counterpart. AHAs have been postulated to exacerbate chronic inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis. On the other hand, AHAs may protect against invasive microbial pathogens and cancer. However, despite more than 50 years of study, the origin and specific B cell compartments that express AHAs remain elusive. Recent research on serum AHAs suggests that they arise during an active immune response, in contrast to previous proposals that they derive from the preexisting immune repertoire in the absence of antigenic stimuli. We report here the isolation and characterization of AHAs from memory B cells, although anti-hinge reactive B cells were also detected in the naïve B cell compartment. IgG AHAs cloned from a single human donor exhibited restricted specificity for protease-cleaved F(ab’)2 fragments and did not bind the intact IgG counterpart. The cloned IgG-specific AHA-variable regions were mutated from germline-derived sequences and displayed a high sequence variability, confirming that these AHAs underwent class-switch recombination and somatic hypermutation. Consistent with previous studies of serum AHAs, several of these clones recognized a linear, peptide-like epitope, but one clone was unique in recognizing a conformational epitope. All cloned AHAs could restore immune effector functions to proteolytically generated F(ab’)2 fragments. Our results confirm that a diverse set of epitope-specific AHAs can be isolated from a single human donor.

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