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Mortality and morbidity among hospitalized adult patients with neurological diseases in Cameroon.

Mortality and morbidity among hospitalized adult patients with neurological diseases in Cameroon.
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Kompoliti K, Doumbe J, Mapoure YN, Nyinyikua T, Ouyang B, Shah H, Calvo S, Fernandez-Sierra A, Delgado MEC,


Kompoliti K, Doumbe J, Mapoure YN, Nyinyikua T, Ouyang B, Shah H, Calvo S, Fernandez-Sierra A, Delgado MEC, (click to view)

Kompoliti K, Doumbe J, Mapoure YN, Nyinyikua T, Ouyang B, Shah H, Calvo S, Fernandez-Sierra A, Delgado MEC,

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Journal of the neurological sciences 2017 08 23381() 165-168 pii 10.1016/j.jns.2017.08.3245

Abstract
BACKGROUND
There is inadequate information on the morbidity and mortality (M&M) from neurological diseases in sub-Saharan Africa.

OBJECTIVE
To record the M&M from neurological diseases in adults in Cameroon from 2013 to 2015 using a registry and surveillance from two urban health care centers.

METHODS
Records from all adult admissions from two urban hospitals over a two year period were reviewed. Adult cases with neurological diagnosis as the main cause for admission were identified. The neurological diagnosis was made by a neurologist in all cases. Variables analyzed were: demographics, neurological diagnosis, medical history, medical center characteristics, morbidity and mortality (M&M). Neurological diseases were classified according to ICD-10.

RESULTS
Among the 2225 neurological admissions of adults, death from neurological disease was recorded in 423 patients (19.01%), and disability in 819 of the survivors (53.6%). The factors that were significantly associated with death in the multivariate analysis were age, history of ischemic cardiac disease, and neurological diagnoses of CNS infection, cerebrovascular disease, and CNS tumor. Similarly, factors associated with disability were medical history of HIV, and cerebrovascular disease, and neurological diagnoses of cerebrovascular disease and CNS tumor. Higher educational level and epilepsy were associated with less disability.

CONCLUSIONS
As expected in this sample, older patients with neurological diseases had more M&M. Morbidity was inversely associated with education, which given that cerebrovascular disease is by far the most common cause of morbidity, indicates the power of risk factor control in preventing neurological disability.

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