The adult neocortex is not hard-wired but instead retains the capacity to reorganise across multiple spatial scales long into adulthood. Plastic reorganisation occurs at the level of mesoscopic sensory maps, functional neuronal assemblies and synaptic ensembles and is thought to be a critical feature of neuronal network function. Here, we describe a series of approaches that use calcium imaging to measure network reorganisation across multiple spatial scales in vivo. At the mesoscopic level, we demonstrate that sensory activity can be measured in animals undergoing longitudinal behavioural assessment involving automated touchscreen tasks. At the cellular level, we show that network dynamics can be longitudinally measured at both stable and transient functional assemblies. At the level of single synapses, we show that functional subcellular calcium imaging approaches can be used to measure synaptic ensembles of dendritic spines in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that all three levels of imaging can be spatially related to local pathology in a preclinical rodent model of amyloidosis. We propose that multi-scale in vivo calcium imaging can be used to measure parallel plasticity processes operating across multiple spatial scales in both the healthy brain and preclinical models of disease.