Never Breastfeeding Linked to Increased Risk of T1DM

Never Breastfeeding Linked to Increased Risk of T1DM

FRIDAY, May 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Never breastfeeding seems to be associated with increased risk of type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online May 9 in Diabetes Care.

Nicolai A. Lund-Blix, from Oslo University Hospital in Norway, and colleagues followed two population-based cohorts of children from birth (1996 to 2009) to 2014 or 2015 (Denmark or Norway). Data were analyzed for 155,392 children. Infant dietary practices at age 6 to 18 months were reported by parents.

The researchers identified type 1 diabetes in 504 children during follow-up, with the incidence of type 1 diabetes being 30.5 and 23.5 per 100,000 person-years in the Norwegian and Danish cohorts, respectively. The risk of type 1 diabetes was increased two-fold for children who were never breastfed versus those who were breastfed (hazard ratio, 2.29; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.14 to 4.61). The incidence of type 1 diabetes was independent of duration of full breastfeeding (hazard ratio per month, 0.99; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.97 to 1.01) and of any breastfeeding (hazard ratio per month, 0.97; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.92 to 1.03) among those who were breastfed.

“Suggestive evidence supports the contention that breastfeeding reduces the risk of type 1 diabetes,” the authors write. “Among those who were breastfed, however, no evidence indicated that prolonging full or any breastfeeding was associated with a reduced risk of type 1 diabetes.”

The study was partially funded by the Novo Nordisk Foundation.

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