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Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Lipid Abnormalities.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Lipid Abnormalities.
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Karkinski D, Georgievski O, Dzekova-Vidimliski P, Milenkovic T, Dokic D,


Karkinski D, Georgievski O, Dzekova-Vidimliski P, Milenkovic T, Dokic D, (click to view)

Karkinski D, Georgievski O, Dzekova-Vidimliski P, Milenkovic T, Dokic D,

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Open access Macedonian journal of medical sciences 2017 01 185(1) 19-22 doi 10.3889/oamjms.2017.011
Abstract
BACKGROUND
There has been a great interest in the interaction between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and metabolic dysfunction, but there is no consistent data suggesting that OSA is a risk factor for dyslipidemia.

AIM
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of lipid abnormalities in patients suspected of OSA, referred to our sleep laboratory for polysomnography.

MATERIAL AND METHODS
Two hundred patients referred to our hospital with suspected OSA, and all of them underwent for standard polysomnography. All patients with respiratory disturbance index (RDI) above 15 were diagnosed with OSA. In the morning after 12 hours fasting, the blood sample was collected from all patients. Blood levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), were determined in all study patients. In the study, both OSA positive and OSA negative patients were divided according to the body mass index (BMI) in two groups. The first group with BMI ≤ 30 kg/m^2 and the second group with BMI > 30 kg/m^2.

RESULTS
OSA positive patients with BMI ≤ 30 kg/m^2 had statistically significant higher levels of triglycerides and total cholesterol, and statistically significant lower level of HDL compared to OSA negative patients with BMI ≤ 30. There were no statistically significant differences in age and LDL levels between these groups. OSA positive patients with BMI > 30 kg/m^2 had higher levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol and LDL and lower levels of HDL versus OSA negative patients with BMI > 30 kg/m^2, but without statistically significant differences.

CONCLUSION
OSA and obesity are potent risk factors for dyslipidemias. OSA could play a significant role in worsening of lipid metabolism in non-obese patients. But in obese patients, the extra weight makes the metabolic changes of lipid metabolism, and the role of OSA is not that very important like in non-obese patients.

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