Advertisement

 

 

Occipital Nerve Stimulation Effective for Chronic Migraine

Occipital Nerve Stimulation Effective for Chronic Migraine
Advertisement

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) — For patients with chronic migraine (CM), peripheral nerve stimulation of the occipital nerves reduces the number of headache days, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Pain Practice.

Nagy A. Mekhail, M.D., Ph.D., from the Cleveland Clinic, and colleagues implanted 20 patients at a single center with a neurostimulation system, and randomized them to an active or control group for 12 weeks. Patients received open-label treatment for an additional 40 weeks.

The researchers observed a reduction in the number of headache days per month (8.51 days; P < 0.0001). Sixty and 35 percent of patients achieved a 30 and 50 percent reduction, respectively, in headache days and/or pain intensity. All patients had reductions in Migraine Disability Assessment and Zung Pain and Distress scores. At least one adverse event was reported by 15 of the patients, with a total of 20 adverse events reported.

“Our results support the 12-month efficacy of 20 CM patients receiving peripheral nerve stimulation of the occipital nerves in this single-center trial,” the authors write.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2016 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
healthday

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

one × one =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]