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October 2017 Briefing – Anesthesiology

October 2017 Briefing – Anesthesiology
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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Anesthesiology for October 2017. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Depressive Symptoms Increase During Internship Year

TUESDAY, Oct. 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Depressive symptoms increase during the internship year for training physicians, with a greater increase among women, according to a study published online Oct. 30 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Afternoon Heart Surgery Linked to Better Patient Outcomes

FRIDAY, Oct. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) — For patients undergoing aortic valve replacement, perioperative myocardial injury occurs more with morning surgery than with afternoon surgery, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in The Lancet.

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Gifts From Pharma Companies Influence Prescribing Behavior

THURSDAY, Oct. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Receipt of gifts from pharmaceutical companies is associated with more prescriptions per patient and more costly prescriptions, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in PLOS One.

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Design Thinking Enables Med Students to Solve Challenges

MONDAY, Oct. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) — A joint effort between students at Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) is training future physicians in design thinking to help identify and repair health system issues that contribute to physician burnout, according to an article by the American Medical Association.

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Clinician Job Satisfaction Linked to Improved Burnout Scores

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Clinicians’ job satisfaction is associated with improved burnout scores and reduced intention to leave their practices, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Conditions Tied to Clinician Dissatisfaction Are Modifiable

THURSDAY, Oct. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Modifiable conditions, like chaos, incohesiveness, and lack of communication, contribute to unsatisfying workplaces for clinicians, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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More Vaginal Births With Lying Down in Second Stage of Labor

THURSDAY, Oct. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) — For nulliparous women at term with a singleton cephalic presentation receiving epidural analgesia, lying down in the second stage of labor results in more spontaneous vaginal births than being upright, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in the BMJ.

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Key Stakeholders Discuss How to Make EHRs More Usable

THURSDAY, Oct. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Key stakeholders and physicians discussed electronic health record (EHR) usability and optimization in the American Medical Association Running Your Practice Community.

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Extended-Release Naltrexone Promising for Opioid Dependence

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Extended-release naltrexone is noninferior to buprenorphine-naloxone for maintaining short-term abstinence from heroin and other illicit substances, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Sharing Passwords Is Widespread Among Medical Staff

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Sharing of passwords to access electronic medical records is common among medical staff members, according to a study published in the July issue of Healthcare Informatics Research.

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Men Now Comprise ~10 Percent of RN Workforce

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) — The increasing participation of men in registered nursing can be attributed to multiple factors, including increasing educational attainment, rising labor demand in health care, and liberalizing gender role attitudes, according to a working paper published by the Washington Center for Equitable Growth.

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Female Physicians May Be Especially at Risk of Burnout

TUESDAY, Oct. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Female physicians are more burned out than their male colleagues, but there are steps they can take to reduce the stress associated with burnout, according to a blog post published in Medical Economics.

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Ketamine Not Linked to PTSD in Military Trauma Setting

TUESDAY, Oct. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Ketamine administration is not associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the military trauma setting, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Anaesthesia.

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Screening Tools Identify Potentially Inappropriate Meds

TUESDAY, Oct. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Internal medicine patients are frequently prescribed potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs), but screening tools can detect clinically relevant PIMs, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

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Most Female Physicians Have Faced Sexist Patient Comments

MONDAY, Oct. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Most female physicians have been sexually harassed by patients at some point in their careers, according to a blog post published in Medical Economics.

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Serious Suffering Affects Almost Half of Those Who Die Yearly

FRIDAY, Oct. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) — In 2015, more than 25.5 million people who died worldwide experienced serious health-related suffering (SHS), and the vast majority lacked access to palliative care and pain relief, according to a report published online Oct. 12 in The Lancet.

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Quality Issues for Both Paper-, Electronic-Based Health Records

FRIDAY, Oct. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Both paper-based and electronic health records (EHRs) have shortcomings in terms of quality of content, process, and structure, with poor quality of nursing documentation seen for both methods, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Court Considering Fate of Noneconomic Damages Cap

THURSDAY, Oct. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) — The Wisconsin Supreme Court is considering whether it will hear a case that will determine the fate of the state’s $750,000 cap on noneconomic damages, according to an article published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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New System Streamlines CME Credit Approval Process

THURSDAY, Oct. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) — The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) and the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) have launched a new performance improvement activity credit reporting process called the AAFP Credit System, according to an article published by the AAFP.

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Low-Cost Services a Major Player in Unnecessary Health Spending

THURSDAY, Oct. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) — The costs associated with low-cost, low-value health services are nearly twice as high as those of high-cost, low-value services, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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30-Day Mortality Lower With Female Surgeons

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Patients treated by female surgeons have a small but significant decrease in 30-day mortality compared with patients treated by male surgeons, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in BMJ.

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Medical License Questions Sway Doctors’ Mental Health Help

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Medical licensure application questions (MLAQs) regarding mental health contribute to physicians’ reluctance to seek help for mental health, according to a study published in the October issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Physician Salaries Appear to Be Flat or Declining

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Anecdotally, physician career coaches report that physician salaries are flat at best, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Guide Offers Doctors Tips for Choosing a Health System

TUESDAY, Oct. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) — A guide has been developed to assist physicians considering joining a physician-led integrated health system, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Medicare Coverage Restrictions for Opioids Rose From ’06 to ’15

TUESDAY, Oct. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) — In an effort to restrict daily allowable prescribed dosing of prescription opioids, Medicare Part D formularies increasingly used quantity limits and prior authorization from 2006 to 2015, according to a research report published online Oct. 9 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Novel Metrics Suggested for Assessing EHR Use

TUESDAY, Oct. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Novel metrics have been developed to assess electronic health record (EHR) use and are described in an opinion article published online Oct. 9 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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2016 Physician Quality Reporting System Reports Available

MONDAY, Oct. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) — The 2016 Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) and the 2016 annual Quality and Resource Use reports have been released for individuals and group practices, according to a report published by the American Academy of Family Physicians.

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Injured Patients Want More Info on Safety Improvement Efforts

MONDAY, Oct. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Communication-and-resolution program (CRP) experiences are positive overall for a small majority of patients and families, but they report that hospitals rarely share information about preventing recurrences, according to a study published online Oct. 9 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Short-Lived Benefits for Abusive Supervisory Behavior

FRIDAY, Oct. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Engaging in abusive supervisory behavior may be associated with short-term beneficial effects, but over longer periods of time, abusive supervisory behavior is negatively related to supervisors’ recovery level and engagement, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in the Academy of Management Journal.

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Longer Anesthesia Duration Tied to More Surgical Complications

FRIDAY, Oct. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Increased anesthesia duration is associated with significantly increased rates of surgical complications, especially the need for postoperative transfusion, among patients undergoing microvascular reconstruction of the head and neck, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Stronger Nocebo Effect When Inert Rx Labeled As Expensive

FRIDAY, Oct. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Nocebo hyperalgesia is stronger when an inert treatment is labeled as being an expensive medication rather than a cheap one, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Science.

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21 Percent of Americans Report Experiencing a Medical Error

THURSDAY, Oct. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) — More than one in five patients report having experienced a medical error, according to a survey released Sept. 28 by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI)/National Patient Safety Foundation Lucian Leape Institute and NORC at the University of Chicago.

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Reasons Physicians Are Delaying Retirement Vary

THURSDAY, Oct. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Physicians are delaying retirement, often because they feel they are providing a useful service to patients or because of concerns about social interaction in retirement, according to an article published online Sept. 25 in Medical Economics.

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Health Literacy Linked to Length of Stay After Abdominal Surgery

THURSDAY, Oct. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) — For patients undergoing major abdominal surgery, lower health literacy levels are independently associated with longer index hospitalization length of stay, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in JAMA Surgery.

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Night Shift Tied to Increased Odds of Abdominal Obesity

THURSDAY, Oct. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Night shift workers have increased odds of obesity/overweight, especially abdominal obesity, according to a meta-analysis published online Oct. 4 in Obesity Reviews.

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Pay Inequality, Work-Life Balance Top Concerns for Female Docs

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Many female physicians report feeling disadvantaged when negotiating contracts and feel that they are assessed for promotion using different criteria than those used for men, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Scientists Support Genome Editing to Prevent Disease

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Many basic scientists and clinical researchers support somatic genome editing in adults for prevention of serious disease but not for human enhancement; they also believe the public should be consulted before any clinical application of germline gene editing proceeds, according to survey results published online Oct. 3 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.

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Communication Program Doesn’t Raise Hospital Liability Costs

TUESDAY, Oct. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) — A communication-and-resolution program, in which hospitals and liability insurers communicate with patients when adverse events occur, does not lead to higher liability costs, according to a study published online Oct. 2 in Health Affairs.

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Hospital Discharges for Prescription Opioids Have Fallen

TUESDAY, Oct. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Prescription opioid-related inpatient and emergency department (ED) discharges have decreased since 2010, while heroin-related discharges have increased sharply since 2008, according to a study published online Oct. 2 in Health Affairs.

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Opioid Manufacturers to Provide Doctor Training

MONDAY, Oct. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) — In an effort to halt the ongoing opioid addiction crisis, U.S. regulators are requiring manufacturers to provide extensive training to doctors, according to a report published by the Associated Press.

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Legal Cannabis Use Common Among Cancer Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) — In Washington state, where cannabis is legal, cancer patients have high rates of active use, and they report that legalization was an important factor in their decision to use, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in Cancer.

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