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Olfactory bulb neuroproteomics reveals a chronological perturbation of survival routes and a disruption of prohibitin complex during Alzheimer’s disease progression.

Olfactory bulb neuroproteomics reveals a chronological perturbation of survival routes and a disruption of prohibitin complex during Alzheimer’s disease progression.
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Lachén-Montes M, González-Morales A, Zelaya MV, Pérez-Valderrama E, Ausín K, Ferrer I, Fernández-Irigoyen J, Santamaría E,


Lachén-Montes M, González-Morales A, Zelaya MV, Pérez-Valderrama E, Ausín K, Ferrer I, Fernández-Irigoyen J, Santamaría E, (click to view)

Lachén-Montes M, González-Morales A, Zelaya MV, Pérez-Valderrama E, Ausín K, Ferrer I, Fernández-Irigoyen J, Santamaría E,

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Scientific reports 2017 08 227(1) 9115 doi 10.1038/s41598-017-09481-x
Abstract

Olfactory dysfunction is among the earliest features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although neuropathological abnormalities have been detected in the olfactory bulb (OB), little is known about its dynamic biology. Here, OB- proteome analysis showed a stage-dependent synaptic proteostasis impairment during AD evolution. In addition to progressive modulation of tau and amyloid precursor protein (APP) interactomes, network-driven proteomics revealed an early disruption of upstream and downstream p38 MAPK pathway and a subsequent impairment of Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1)/Protein kinase C (PKC) signaling axis in the OB from AD subjects. Moreover, a mitochondrial imbalance was evidenced by a depletion of Prohibitin-2 (Phb2) levels and a specific decrease in the phosphorylated isoforms of Phb1 in intermediate and advanced AD stages. Interestingly, olfactory Phb subunits were also deregulated across different types of dementia. Phb2 showed a specific up-regulation in mixed dementia, while Phb1 isoforms were down-regulated in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). However, no differences were observed in the olfactory expression of Phb subunits in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). To sum up, our data reflect, in part, the missing links in the biochemical understanding of olfactory dysfunction in AD, unveiling Phb complex as a differential driver of neurodegeneration at olfactory level.

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