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Omega-3 Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Preeclampsia: Trials Say "No," but Is It the Final Word?

Omega-3 Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Preeclampsia: Trials Say "No," but Is It the Final Word?
Author Information (click to view)

Burchakov DI, Kuznetsova IV, Uspenskaya YB,


Burchakov DI, Kuznetsova IV, Uspenskaya YB, (click to view)

Burchakov DI, Kuznetsova IV, Uspenskaya YB,

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Nutrients 2017 12 159(12) pii E1364
Abstract

Preeclampsia is a dangerous disorder of pregnancy, defined as hypertension with proteinuria. Its nature remains elusive, and measures of prevention and treatment are limited. Observational studies have suggested that preeclampsia is associated with low intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA). In recent decades, researchers studied LCPUFA supplementation as a measure to prevent preeclampsia. Most of these trials and later systematic reviews yielded negative results. However, these trials had several important limitations associated with heterogeneity and other issues. Recent research suggests that preeclampsia trials should take into consideration the gender of the fetus (and thus sexual dimorphism of placenta), the positive effect of smoking on preeclampsia prevalence, and the possibility that high doses of LCPUFA mid-term or later may promote the disorder instead of keeping it at bay. In this review, we discuss these issues and future prospects for LCPUFA in preeclampsia research.

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