For a study, researchers sought to explore the clinical and radiological results of minimally invasive (MI) versus open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in patients with single-level lumbar spondylolisthesis for more than a 10-year time frame. Investigators reflectively gathered the results of patients with single-level lumbar spondylolisthesis who underwent TLIF strategies utilizing a MI (n=108) or open (n=53) approach. About 52 (48%) and 31 (58%) patients in the MI-TLIF and open TLIF gatherings finished the 10-year follow-up separately. An essential clinical result incorporated the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores for back and leg torment at the gauge and 2, 5, and 10 years postoperatively. The radiographic combination rate and occurrence of the auxiliary medical procedure because of neighboring section sickness were surveyed at 2, 5, and 10 years postoperatively. Intraoperative blood misfortune and length of hospitalization were fundamentally lower in the MI-TLIF bunch than in the open TLIF bunch. At 2 years postoperatively, the ODI and VAS scores for back and leg torment were lower in the MI-TLIF bunch than in the open TLIF bunch. No huge contrasts were found in VAS scores for back and leg torment or ODI scores between the 2 gatherings at 10 years postoperatively. Radiographic combination rates and commonness of auxiliary medical procedures for adjoining portion sickness were not altogether unique between the gatherings at 10 years postoperatively. The viability of MI-TLIF for patients with single-level lumbar spondylolisthesis was equivalent to that of open TLIF north of 10 years. Be that as it may, MI-TLIF might have more prevalent perioperative recuperation and 2-year postoperative practical results than open TLIF.

Source: journals.lww.com/spinejournal/Abstract/2022/06010/Ten_Year_Outcomes_of_Minimally_Invasive_Versus.1.aspx