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Outbreak and genotyping of canine distemper virus in captive Siberian tigers and red pandas.

Outbreak and genotyping of canine distemper virus in captive Siberian tigers and red pandas.
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Zhang H, Shan F, Zhou X, Li B, Zhai JQ, Zou SZ, Wu MF, Chen W, Zhai SL, Luo ML,


Zhang H, Shan F, Zhou X, Li B, Zhai JQ, Zou SZ, Wu MF, Chen W, Zhai SL, Luo ML, (click to view)

Zhang H, Shan F, Zhou X, Li B, Zhai JQ, Zou SZ, Wu MF, Chen W, Zhai SL, Luo ML,

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Scientific reports 2017 08 157(1) 8132 doi 10.1038/s41598-017-08462-4
Abstract

In this study, four canine distemper virus (CDV) strains were isolated from captive Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) and red pandas (Ailurus fulgens) during two separate CDV outbreaks in a zoo in Guangdong province, China. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses based on the full-length hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) genes showed that they were closely identical to genotype Asia-1. Prior to confirmation of CDV in Siberian tigers, to control spread of the disease, a live attenuated combination CDV vaccine was used among almost all carnivore animals except for red pandas in which another recombinant combination CDV vaccine was used. However, about two months later, CDV re-emerged and caused the death among red pandas. Based on the vaccination records, the live combination vaccine could be considered an ideal weapon against CDV in zoo carnivore animals. Although the recombinant combination CDV vaccine was safe for red pandas, its protection effectiveness remains to be further investigated. Moreover, according to the outbreak interval time and sequence characterization, we suspected that stray cats circulating in the zoo were the intermediate host, which contributed to CDV spread from stray dogs to zoo animals. This study revealed the importance of vaccination and biosecurity for zoo animals.

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