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Outcomes of head and neck cancer surgery in the geriatric population based on case volume at academic centers.

Outcomes of head and neck cancer surgery in the geriatric population based on case volume at academic centers.
Author Information (click to view)

Jalisi S, Rubin SJ, Wu KY, Kirke DN,


Jalisi S, Rubin SJ, Wu KY, Kirke DN, (click to view)

Jalisi S, Rubin SJ, Wu KY, Kirke DN,

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The Laryngoscope 2017 07 12127(11) 2539-2544 doi 10.1002/lary.26750

Abstract
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS
Evaluate the impact of case volume and other variables on cost and mortality after head and neck oncologic surgery in the geriatric population.

STUDY DESIGN
Cross-sectional study.

METHODS
The Vizient database was accessed for data on geriatric patients (age ≥65 years) who underwent surgery for head and neck cancers (excluding thyroid and skin cancer) at full member academic medical centers between 2009 and 2012. Multivariate, linear regression analyses, χ(2) tests, and analysis of variance were applied to evaluate significant associations between hospital case volume and independent variables including cost, cost index, mortality, mortality index, length of stay, length of stay index, and readmission rates.

RESULTS
A total of 4,544 patients were included. Total length of stay was 6.72 days in high-volume hospitals, compared to 8.12 days and 7.91 days in moderate- and low-volume hospitals, respectively (P = .0144). Frequency of intensive care unit stays was 36.5% in high-volume hospitals, compared to 42.19% and 40.29% in moderate- and low-volume hospitals, respectively (P = .0048). Mortality (0.78%) and average cost per case ($21,834) was lower, but nonsignificant in high-volume hospitals. Using multiple regression analysis, major severity of disease was positively associated with complication rate (P < .0001) and length of stay (P = .0481). CONCLUSIONS
After controlling for other factors, high-volume academic medical centers have a lower intensive care unit stay, but no difference in mortality or average cost per case when compared to low-volume hospitals.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE
2b. Laryngoscope, 127:2539-2544, 2017.

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