For a study, researchers sought to compare the gastrointestinal symptoms profiles of pediatric patients with gastroparesis to matched healthy controls using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL™) Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales and to compare pediatric patients with gastroparesis to pediatric patients with gastroparesis-like symptoms and normal gastric emptying, as well as pediatric patients with gastroparesis-like symptoms and normal gastric emptying to matched healthy controls. The PedsQL™ Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales were completed by 64 pediatric patients with gastroparesis, 59 pediatric patients with gastroparesis-like symptoms and normal gastric emptying, and 200 age, gender, and race/ethnicity matched healthy controls. The PedsQL™ Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales encompass 10 individual multi-item scales measuring stomach pain, discomfort when eating, food and drink limits, trouble swallowing, heartburn and reflux, nausea and vomiting, gas and bloating, constipation, blood in poop, and diarrhea/fecal incontinence. Based on gastric emptying scintigraphy testing results, the study found that those with abnormal gastric retention were classified as having gastroparesis. The gastrointestinal symptoms profile analysis found that people with gastroparesis have a lot of differences from healthy people. The biggest differences were in the symptoms in the upper part of the stomach, like pain, discomfort when eating, food and drink limits, nausea, and vomiting. People with gastroparesis said they had similar symptoms to those without gastroparesis, except they had more constipation. Pediatric patients with gastroparesis report having many gastrointestinal problems compared to healthy people. This problem needs more effective interventions so the patients can function like healthy people.

 

Source: journals.lww.com/jpgn/Abstract/2022/08000/Gastrointestinal_Symptoms_Profile_in_Pediatric.8.aspx