Regular practice of physical activity is associated with better quality of life and functioning in people with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and depression. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no evidence of the association between physical activity and quality of life and global functioning among people in the initial stages of psychosis. The aim to explore the association of the level of physical activity with quality of life and global functioning among patients in early stages of psychosis.
Cross-sectional study carried out in an early intervention program in 2016. The socio-demographic and clinical variables were assessed via a form; the adherence through the Measurement of Treatment Adherence; the global functioning through the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale; the level of physical activity through the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and quality of life through the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). The Mann-Whitney test was used for analysis.
A total of eighty-five participants (mean age=32, 57.6% were men) were assessed. Of the 85, 46 (54.1%) were classified as physically active. The physically active patients presented higher values, on average (standard deviation), in relation to the SF-36 domain of physical functioning (active patients: 87.1 (20.9) vs. inactive patients 80.1 (20.5) inactive; p=0.016), and global functioning when compared to the physically inactive group (active patients: 71.5 (17.6) vs. inactive patients 60.1 (20.9); p=0.011).
Higher levels of physical activity are associated with better quality of life and higher global functioning in patients in early stages of psychosis.

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