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Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone but not aldosterone is correlated with blood pressure in patients with aldosterone-producing adenomas.

Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone but not aldosterone is correlated with blood pressure in patients with aldosterone-producing adenomas.
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Kobayashi H, Haketa A, Takahiro U, Otsuka H, Tanaka S, Hatanaka Y, Ikeda Y, Abe M, Fukuda N, Soma M,


Kobayashi H, Haketa A, Takahiro U, Otsuka H, Tanaka S, Hatanaka Y, Ikeda Y, Abe M, Fukuda N, Soma M, (click to view)

Kobayashi H, Haketa A, Takahiro U, Otsuka H, Tanaka S, Hatanaka Y, Ikeda Y, Abe M, Fukuda N, Soma M,

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Journal of clinical hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.) 2016 12 05() doi 10.1111/jch.12956
Abstract

Although plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) varies depending on primary aldosteronism (PA) subtypes, patients with different subtypes may have similar blood pressure (BP). The authors hypothesized that hormones other than aldosterone might influence BP in PA patients. A total of 73 PA cases, including 30 cases of aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs), 29 cases of bilateral hyperaldosteronism, and 24 control cases of essential hypertension were enrolled retrospectively. The authors examined the levels of aldosterone, cortisol, renin, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) measured at 12 am, 6 am, 12 pm, and 6 pm and BP in the early morning (6 am to 7 am), late morning (9 am to 11 am), and early evening (5 pm to 7 pm). Results showed no statistically significant correlation between PAC and BP in the patients with PA; however, early and late morning systolic BP strongly correlated with ACTH at 6 am in patients with APA. These results suggest that hormones other than aldosterone, such as ACTH, may affect BP in patients with APA.

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