Advertisement

 

 

Predictors of occupational burnout among nurses: A dominance analysis of job stressors.

Predictors of occupational burnout among nurses: A dominance analysis of job stressors.
Author Information (click to view)

Sun JW, Bai HY, Li JH, Lin PZ, Zhang HH, Cao FL,


Sun JW, Bai HY, Li JH, Lin PZ, Zhang HH, Cao FL, (click to view)

Sun JW, Bai HY, Li JH, Lin PZ, Zhang HH, Cao FL,

Advertisement
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Journal of clinical nursing 2017 02 08() doi 10.1111/jocn.13754
Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES
To quantitatively compare dimensions of job stressors’ effects on nurses’ burnout.

BACKGROUND
Nurses, a key group of health service providers, often experience stressors at work. Extensive research has examined the relationship between job stressors and burnout; however, less has specifically compared the effects of job stressor domains on nurses’ burnout.

DESIGN
A quantitative cross-sectional survey examined three general hospitals in Jinan, China.

METHOD
Participants were 602 nurses. We compared five potential stressors’ ability to predict nurses’ burnout using dominance analysis and assuming that each stressor was inter-correlated.

RESULTS
Strong positive correlations were found between all five job stressors and burnout. Interpersonal relationships and management issues most strongly predicted participants’ burnout (11.3% of average variance).

CONCLUSION
Job stressors, and particularly interpersonal relationships and management issues, significantly predict nurses’ job burnout.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE
Understanding the relative effect of job stressors may help identify fruitful areas for intervention and improve nurse recruitment and retention. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

five + thirteen =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]