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Prenatal PPI, H2 Blocker Use Linked to Asthma Risk in Child

Prenatal PPI, H2 Blocker Use Linked to Asthma Risk in Child
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THURSDAY, Jan. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Prenatal, maternal, acid-suppressive drug use is associated with an increased risk of childhood asthma, according to a review published online Jan. 11 in Pediatrics.

Tianwen Lai, M.D., Ph.D., from Zhejiang University in China, and colleagues conducted a systematic literature review to identify eight population-based studies that assessed acid-suppressive drug use during pregnancy and the risk of childhood asthma in offspring.

In pooled analysis, the researchers found that acid-suppressive drug use in pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of asthma in childhood (relative risk, 1.45). Among proton pump inhibitor users, the overall risk of asthma in childhood increased (relative risk, 1.34). Similarly, the risk increased in histamine-2 receptor antagonist users (relative risk, 1.57).

“The evidence suggests that prenatal, maternal, acid-suppressive drug use is associated with an increased risk of childhood asthma,” the authors write. “This information may help clinicians and parents to use caution when deciding whether to take acid-suppressing drugs during pregnancy because of the risk of asthma in offspring.”

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