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Presence of environmental coagulase-positive staphylococci, their clonal relationship, resistance factors and ability to form biofilm.

Presence of environmental coagulase-positive staphylococci, their clonal relationship, resistance factors and ability to form biofilm.
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Velázquez-Guadarrama N, Olivares-Cervantes AL, Salinas E, Martínez L, Escorcia M, Oropeza R, Rosas I,


Velázquez-Guadarrama N, Olivares-Cervantes AL, Salinas E, Martínez L, Escorcia M, Oropeza R, Rosas I, (click to view)

Velázquez-Guadarrama N, Olivares-Cervantes AL, Salinas E, Martínez L, Escorcia M, Oropeza R, Rosas I,

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Revista Argentina de microbiologia 2016 12 22() pii 10.1016/j.ram.2016.08.006

Abstract

Coagulase-positive staphylococci (CoPS) are opportunistic pathogens carrying various mechanisms of resistance that have a large number of virulence factors, and whose ability to induce illness is associated with the host. This study aimed to investigate the presence of environmental coagulase-positive staphylococci, their susceptibility profile, clonal relationship and ability to form biofilm. The 16S rRNA genes from CoPS isolates were analyzed, and their antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated using the agar dilution method in accordance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. The clonal profile was obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and biofilm formation was measured by a crystal violet retention assay. A total of 72 Staphylococcus spp. strains were isolated from air, metal surfaces, and nostrils from humans, dogs, cats, and birds. Three species were identified: Staphylococcus aureus (17%), Staphylococcus intermedius (63%), and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (21%). Ninety three percent (93%) of the strains were resistant to at least one of 13 tested antibiotics. S. pseudintermedius strains were the only resistant ones to methicillin while most of these isolates were multidrug-resistant, had significantly higher ability to form biofilm and PFGE grouped into seven different patterns, without showing clonal dispersion among animals and environmental isolates. This study suggests that dogs, cat, and air are environmental sources potentially carrying multidrug-resistant S. pseudintermedius, which survives in different environments through biofilm formation and multidrug resistance, characteristics that can be transmitted horizontally to other bacteria and exacerbate the problem of antibiotic resistance in humans.

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