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Racial differences in prostate cancer risk in young HIV-positive and HIV-negative men: a prospective cohort study.

Racial differences in prostate cancer risk in young HIV-positive and HIV-negative men: a prospective cohort study.
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Dutta A, Uno H, Holman A, Lorenz DR, Gabuzda D,


Dutta A, Uno H, Holman A, Lorenz DR, Gabuzda D, (click to view)

Dutta A, Uno H, Holman A, Lorenz DR, Gabuzda D,

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Cancer causes & control : CCC 2017 04 27() doi 10.1007/s10552-017-0896-9

Abstract
PURPOSE
African American men have the highest incidence of prostate cancer among ethnic groups, and racial disparity is highest in younger men. Prostate cancer prevalence is rising in HIV-infected men due to improved survival on antiretroviral therapies, yet little is known about racial differences in prostate cancer risk by HIV-infection status and age.

METHODS
This is a prospective cohort study of prostate cancer risk in 2,800 HIV-infected and -uninfected men who have sex with men (MSM) aged 40-70 years (22% African American) who were enrolled in the multicenter AIDS cohort study from 1996 to 2010. Poisson regression models were used to examine associations between race and HIV-infection status and prostate cancer risk among men aged 40-70, 40-55, and 56-70 years.

RESULTS
Among men aged 40-70 years, incidence rates (IR) per 100,000 person-years were 169 among all men and 276 among African American HIV-infected men. Prostate cancer risk was similar by HIV-infection status (IRR 1.0, 95% CI 0.55-1.82), but nearly threefold higher in African Americans compared to non-African Americans in adjusted models (IRRs 2.66 and 3.22, 95% CIs 1.36-5.18 and 1.27-8.16 for all or HIV-infected men, respectively). Racial disparity in prostate cancer risk was greatest in African American men aged 40-55 years (adjusted IRR 3.31, 95% CI 1.19-9.22). Prostate cancer risk showed associations with family history of prostate cancer (p = 0.001), but not heavy smoking, androgen supplement use, or HIV-related factors.

CONCLUSIONS
Among MSM, African American HIV-positive and HIV-negative men aged 40-55 years have threefold increased risk of young-onset prostate cancer compared to non-African American men, highlighting the need to make informed decisions about screening in this population.

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