The current study will concentrate on drug hypersensitivity responses to chemotherapy, especially those medicines that are most commonly used in children. We know that all chemotherapeutic drugs have the potential to produce infusion responses, which are commonly referred to as adverse drug reactions. Some are Type A, defined as predicted and detailed in the drug’s features and others, while some are Type B, defined as unexpected reactions that cannot be explained by the drug’s known toxicity profile. When a medication causes an unanticipated reaction, we might refer to it as a hypersensitive reaction (HSRs). Some of these (HSRs) are allergic responses since they are triggered by an immunologic mechanism. The platinum salts derivatives, taxanes, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, l-asparaginase, procarbazine, etoposide, bleomycin, and cytarabin are the most often linked cytotoxic drugs with HSRs. HSRs can also develop in children with cancer following chemotherapeutic drug therapy. Carboplatin, l-asparaginase, and methothrexate are the most often utilized medicines in children to produce HSRs. The purpose of this study is to summarize the occurrence and clinical characteristics of HSRs associated with these medications in children.

The purpose of this study is to summarize the occurrence and clinical characteristics of HSRs associated with these medications in children. The present review will concentrate on the most problematic medications in children, the types of responses they cause, the processes involved, and the best approach to treat them.

Reference: https://journals.lww.com/co-allergy/Abstract/2017/08000/Reactions_to_cytostatic_agents_in_children.5.aspx