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Reducing sedation time for thyroplasty with arytenoid adduction with sequential anesthetic technique.

Reducing sedation time for thyroplasty with arytenoid adduction with sequential anesthetic technique.
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Saadeh CK, Rosero EB, Joshi GP, Ozayar E, Mau T,


Saadeh CK, Rosero EB, Joshi GP, Ozayar E, Mau T, (click to view)

Saadeh CK, Rosero EB, Joshi GP, Ozayar E, Mau T,

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The Laryngoscope 2017 07 08() doi 10.1002/lary.26743
Abstract
OBJECTIVE
To determine the extent to which a sequential anesthetic technique 1) shortens time under sedation for thyroplasty with arytenoid adduction (TP-AA), 2) affects the total operative time, and 3) changes the voice outcome compared to TP-AA performed entirely under sedation/analgesia.

STUDY DESIGN
Case-control study.

METHODS
A new sequential anesthetic technique of performing most of the TP-AA surgery under general anesthesia (GA), followed by transition to sedation/analgesia (SA) for voice assessment, was developed to achieve smooth emergence from GA. Twenty-five TP-AA cases performed with the sequential GA-SA technique were compared with 25 TP-AA controls performed completely under sedation/analgesia. The primary outcome measure was the time under sedation. Voice improvement, as assessed by Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice, and total operative time were secondary outcome measures.

RESULTS
With the conventional all-SA anesthetic, the duration of SA was 209 ± 26.3 minutes. With the sequential GA-SA technique, the duration of SA was 79.0 ± 18.9 minutes, a 62.3% reduction (P < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the total operative time (209.5 vs. 200.9 minutes; P = 0.42) or in voice outcome. This sequential anesthetic technique has been easily adopted by multiple anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists at our institution. CONCLUSION
TP-AA is effectively performed under sequential GA-SA technique with a significant reduction in the duration of time under sedation. This allows the surgeon to perform the technically more challenging part of the surgery under GA, without having to contend with variability in patient tolerance for laryngeal manipulation under sedation.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE
3b. Laryngoscope, 2017.

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