Advertisement

 

 

Relation of uric acid level to rapid kidney function decline and development of kidney disease: The Jackson Heart Study.

Relation of uric acid level to rapid kidney function decline and development of kidney disease: The Jackson Heart Study.
Author Information (click to view)

Mwasongwe SE, Fülöp T, Katz R, Musani SK, Sims M, Correa A, Flessner MF, Young BA,


Mwasongwe SE, Fülöp T, Katz R, Musani SK, Sims M, Correa A, Flessner MF, Young BA, (click to view)

Mwasongwe SE, Fülöp T, Katz R, Musani SK, Sims M, Correa A, Flessner MF, Young BA,

Advertisement

Journal of clinical hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.) 2018 02 16() doi 10.1111/jch.13239
Abstract

Whether elevated uric acid (UA) is an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD) is not well established. The authors evaluated the relationship of UA with rapid kidney function decline (RKFD) and incident CKD among 3702 African Americans (AAs) in the Jackson Heart Study with serum UA levels measured at baseline exam (2000-2004). RKFD was defined as ≥ 30% eGFR loss and incident CKD as development of eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 mwith a ≥ 25% decline in eGFR between baseline and exam 3 (2009-2013). RKFD and CKD were found in 11.4% and 7.5% of the participants, respectively. In a fully adjusted model, the odds of RKFD (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.25-2.49) and incident CKD (OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.31-3.06) were significantly higher among participants in the top UA quartile vs bottom quartile. In the JHS, elevated UA was significantly associated with RKFD and incident CKD.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

twelve − eleven =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]