Oxidative stress in children with type 1 DM (T1DM) may negatively affect the bone.
This study included 40 children with T1DM as the patient group and 40 healthy children as the control group. Plasma alkaline phosphatase, procollagen type-1 amino-terminal propeptide (P1NP), and urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD) were measured to assess bone turnover. Glutathione, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured to assess oxidative stress.
Patients with T1DM had a significantly lower P1NP level but a significantly higher urinary DPD level compared to the control group. Moreover, there were significantly lower glutathione and SOD levels with significantly higher MDA levels in patients with T1DM. We found a significant positive correlation between P1NP level and both glutathione and SOD levels but a significant negative correlation between P1NP and MDA in patients with T1DM. There was a significant negative correlation between DPD levels and both glutathione and SOD levels and a significant positive correlation between DPD and MDA. Moreover, glutathione was a significant predictor for both P1NP and DPD levels, while MDA was a significant predictor for P1NP levels.
There is an association between oxidative stress and bone turnover markers in children with T1DM.
Oxidative stress can negatively affect bone but the exact relationship between oxidative stress and bone turnover in T1DM has not been previously studied in pediatrics.For the best of our knowledge, our study was the first to assess the relationship between oxidative stress and bone turnover in children with T1DM.We revealed that increased oxidative stress in children and adolescents with T1DM may be involved in the impairment of bone turnover process, so treatment strategies toward better glycemic control and decreasing oxidative stress may be beneficial in preventing and treating diabetic bone disease in these children.

References

PubMed