Advertisement

 

 

Repetitive motor cortex stimulation reinforces the pain modulation circuits of peripheral neuropathic pain.

Repetitive motor cortex stimulation reinforces the pain modulation circuits of peripheral neuropathic pain.
Author Information (click to view)

Cha M, Um SW, Kwon M, Nam TS, Lee BH,


Cha M, Um SW, Kwon M, Nam TS, Lee BH, (click to view)

Cha M, Um SW, Kwon M, Nam TS, Lee BH,

Advertisement

Scientific reports 2017 08 117(1) 7986 doi 10.1038/s41598-017-08208-2
Abstract

Recent evidence indicates that motor cortex stimulation (MCS) is a potentially effective treatment for chronic neuropathic pain. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the attenuated hyperalgesia after MCS are not completely understood. In this study, we investigated the neural mechanism of the effects of MCS using an animal model of neuropathic pain. After 10 daily sessions of MCS, repetitive MCS reduced mechanical allodynia and contributed to neuronal changes in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Interestingly, inhibition of protein kinase M zeta (PKMζ), a regulator of synaptic plasticity, in the ACC blocked the effects of repetitive MCS. Histological and molecular studies showed a significantly increased level of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in the ACC after peripheral neuropathy, and neither MCS treatment nor ZIP administration affected this increase. These results suggest that repetitive MCS can attenuate the mechanical allodynia in neuropathic pain, and that the activation of PKMζ in the ACC may play a role in the modulation of neuropathic pain via MCS.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

7 + two =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]