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Risk assessment for Japanese encephalitis vaccination.

Risk assessment for Japanese encephalitis vaccination.
Author Information (click to view)

Turtle L, Driver C,


Turtle L, Driver C, (click to view)

Turtle L, Driver C,

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Human vaccines & immunotherapeutics 2017 12 15() 0 doi 10.1080/21645515.2017.1380756
Abstract

Japanese encephalitis (JE) is the most commonly diagnosed viral encephalitis in Asia. JE is caused by a virus called JE virus (JEV), a member of the genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae, and is transmitted by Culex mosquitoes. Neutralising antibody to JEV protects against JE, and can be induced by vaccination. JE is a potential threat to travellers to endemic areas, which are most of South and Southeast Asia and some Pacific Islands. The risk of JE can be expected to increase with increasing mosquito exposure and time spent in regions and seasons of active transmission. JE is very rare in travellers, but mortality is high, around 1 in 3, and there is a high rate of lasting neurological damage. JE can therefore be a profoundly life changing event for a traveller. Travellers and their healthcare providers need to balance the low risk of disease against the very high severity of disease if it does occur. In order to make an informed decision, the severity of JE disease should be carefully explained to travellers to Asia.

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