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Route to improving Type 1 diabetes mellitus glycaemic outcomes: real-world evidence taken from the National Diabetes Audit.

Route to improving Type 1 diabetes mellitus glycaemic outcomes: real-world evidence taken from the National Diabetes Audit.
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Heald AH, Livingston M, Fryer A, Moreno GYC, Malipatil N, Gadsby R, Ollier W, Lunt M, Stedman M, Young RJ,


Heald AH, Livingston M, Fryer A, Moreno GYC, Malipatil N, Gadsby R, Ollier W, Lunt M, Stedman M, Young RJ, (click to view)

Heald AH, Livingston M, Fryer A, Moreno GYC, Malipatil N, Gadsby R, Ollier W, Lunt M, Stedman M, Young RJ,

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Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association 2017 11 09() doi 10.1111/dme.13541
Abstract
AIM
To use general practice-level data for England, available through the National Diabetes Audit, and primary care prescribing data to identify prescription treatment factors associated with variations in achieved glucose control (HbA1c ).

METHODS
General practice-level National Diabetes Audit data on Type 1 diabetes, including details of population characteristics, services, proportion of people achieving target glycaemic control [HbA1c ≤58 mmol/mol (7.5%)] and proportion of people at high glycaemic risk [HbA1c >86 mmol/ml (10%)], were linked to 2013-2016 primary care diabetes prescribing data on insulin types and blood glucose monitoring for all people with diabetes.

RESULTS
A wide variation was found between the 10(th) percentile and the 90(th) percentile of general practices in both target glycaemic control (15.6% to 44.8%, respectively) and high glycaemic risk (4.8% to 28.6%, respectively). Our analysis suggests that, given the extrapolated total of 280 000 people with Type 1 diabetes in the UK, there may be the potential to increase the number of those within target glycaemic control from 80 000 to 101 000; 53% of this increase (11 000 people) would result from service improvements and 47% (10 000 people) from medication and technology changes. The same improvements would also provide the opportunity to reduce the number of people at high glycaemic risk from 42 000 to 26 500. A key factor associated with practice-level target HbA1c achievement was greater use of insulin pumps for up to an additional 56 000 people.

CONCLUSION
If the HbA1c achievement rates in service provision, medication and use of technology currently seen in practices in the 90(th) percentile were to be matched with regard to HbA1c achievement rates in all general practices, glycaemic control might be improved for 36 500 people, with all the attendant health benefits. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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