Advertisement

 

 

School Self-Concept in Adolescents With Chronic Pain.

School Self-Concept in Adolescents With Chronic Pain.
Author Information (click to view)

Logan DE, Gray LS, Iversen CN, Kim S,


Logan DE, Gray LS, Iversen CN, Kim S, (click to view)

Logan DE, Gray LS, Iversen CN, Kim S,

Advertisement

Journal of pediatric psychology 2017 04 11() doi 10.1093/jpepsy/jsx063
Abstract
Objective 
This study investigated school self-efficacy and sense of school membership (collectively "school self-concept") as potential influences on impaired school function among adolescents with chronic pain, including comparison of adolescents with primary pain to those with disease-based pain and pain-free peers.  In all, 264 adolescents (12-17 years old) with primary pain conditions, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or no pain completed measures of functional disability, school functioning, pain characteristics, and school self-concept, the Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for School Situations (SEQ-SS), and Psychological Sense of School Membership (PSSM).  Both the SEQ-SS and PSSM demonstrated reliability and some validity, with the SEQ-SS more strongly supported. As a group, adolescents with primary pain conditions reported poorer school self-concept. School self-efficacy, but not school belongingness, predicted school functioning later in the school year.  School self-concept, especially as assessed with the SEQ-SS, is relevant and important to assess when addressing school functioning in youth with chronic pain.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

five × five =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]