Advertisement

 

 

Serological Evidence of Contrasted Exposure to Arboviral Infections between Islands of the Union of Comoros (Indian Ocean).

Serological Evidence of Contrasted Exposure to Arboviral Infections between Islands of the Union of Comoros (Indian Ocean).
Author Information (click to view)

Dellagi K, Salez N, Maquart M, Larrieu S, Yssouf A, Silaï R, Leparc-Goffart I, Tortosa P, de Lamballerie X,


Dellagi K, Salez N, Maquart M, Larrieu S, Yssouf A, Silaï R, Leparc-Goffart I, Tortosa P, de Lamballerie X, (click to view)

Dellagi K, Salez N, Maquart M, Larrieu S, Yssouf A, Silaï R, Leparc-Goffart I, Tortosa P, de Lamballerie X,

Advertisement
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

PLoS neglected tropical diseases 2016 12 1510(12) e0004840 doi 10.1371/journal.pntd.0004840
Abstract

A cross sectional serological survey of arboviral infections in humans was conducted on the three islands of the Union of Comoros, Indian Ocean, in order to test a previously suggested contrasted exposure of the three neighboring islands to arthropod-borne epidemics. Four hundred human sera were collected on Ngazidja (Grande Comore), Mwali (Mohéli) and Ndzouani (Anjouan), and were tested by ELISA for IgM and/or IgG antibodies to Dengue (DENV), Chikungunya (CHIKV), Rift Valley fever (RVFV), West Nile (WNV), Tick borne encephalitis (TBEV) and Yellow fever (YFV) viruses and for neutralizing antibodies to DENV serotypes 1-4. Very few sera were positive for IgM antibodies to the tested viruses indicating that the sero-survey was performed during an inter epidemic phase for the investigated arbovirus infections, except for RVF which showed evidence of recent infections on all three islands. IgG reactivity with at least one arbovirus was observed in almost 85% of tested sera, with seropositivity rates increasing with age, indicative of an intense and long lasting exposure of the Comorian population to arboviral risk. Interestingly, the positivity rates for IgG antibodies to DENV and CHIKV were significantly higher on Ngazidja, confirming the previously suggested prominent exposure of this island to these arboviruses, while serological traces of WNV infection were detected most frequently on Mwali suggesting some transmission specificities associated with this island only. The study provides the first evidence for circulation of RVFV in human populations from the Union of Comoros and further suggests that the virus is currently circulating on the three islands in an inconspicuous manner. This study supports contrasted exposure of the islands of the Comoros archipelago to arboviral infections. The observation is discussed in terms of ecological factors that may affect the abundance and distribution of vector populations on the three islands as well as concurring anthropogenic factors that may impact arbovirus transmission in this diverse island ecosystem.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

twelve + ten =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]