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Serum-Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Concentrations Are Inversely Associated with Atherosclerotic Diseases in Humans.

Serum-Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Concentrations Are Inversely Associated with Atherosclerotic Diseases in Humans.
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Soltau I, Mudersbach E, Geissen M, Schwedhelm E, Winkler MS, Geffken M, Peine S, Schoen G, Debus ES, Larena-Avellaneda A, Daum G,


Soltau I, Mudersbach E, Geissen M, Schwedhelm E, Winkler MS, Geffken M, Peine S, Schoen G, Debus ES, Larena-Avellaneda A, Daum G, (click to view)

Soltau I, Mudersbach E, Geissen M, Schwedhelm E, Winkler MS, Geffken M, Peine S, Schoen G, Debus ES, Larena-Avellaneda A, Daum G,

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PloS one 2016 12 1411(12) e0168302 doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0168302
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Atherosclerotic changes of arteries are the leading cause for deaths in cardiovascular disease and greatly impair patient’s quality of life. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a signaling sphingolipid that regulates potentially pro-as well as anti-atherogenic processes. Here, we investigate whether serum-S1P concentrations are associated with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and carotid stenosis (CS).

METHODS AND RESULTS
Serum was sampled from blood donors (controls, N = 174) and from atherosclerotic patients (N = 132) who presented to the hospital with either clinically relevant PAD (N = 102) or CS (N = 30). From all subjects, serum-S1P was measured by mass spectrometry and blood parameters were determined by routine laboratory assays. When compared to controls, atherosclerotic patients before invasive treatment to restore blood flow showed significantly lower serum-S1P levels. This difference cannot be explained by risk factors for atherosclerosis (old age, male gender, hypertension, hypercholesteremia, obesity, diabetes or smoking) or comorbidities (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, kidney insufficiency or arrhythmia). Receiver operating characteristic curves suggest that S1P has more power to indicate atherosclerosis (PAD and CS) than high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C). In 35 patients, serum-S1P was measured again between one and six months after treatment. In this group, serum-S1P concentrations rose after treatment independent of whether patients had PAD or CS, or whether they underwent open or endovascular surgery. Post-treatment S1P levels were highly associated to platelet numbers measured pre-treatment.

CONCLUSIONS
Our study shows that PAD and CS in humans is associated with decreased serum-S1P concentrations and that S1P may possess higher accuracy to indicate these diseases than HDL-C.

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