Advertisement

 

 

Setting up a community-based cervical screening service in a low-income country: a pilot study from north-western Tanzania.

Setting up a community-based cervical screening service in a low-income country: a pilot study from north-western Tanzania.
Author Information (click to view)

Masalu N, Serra P, Amadori D, Kahima J, Majinge C, Rwehabura J, Nanni O, Bravaccini S, Puccetti M, Tumino R, Bucchi L,


Masalu N, Serra P, Amadori D, Kahima J, Majinge C, Rwehabura J, Nanni O, Bravaccini S, Puccetti M, Tumino R, Bucchi L, (click to view)

Masalu N, Serra P, Amadori D, Kahima J, Majinge C, Rwehabura J, Nanni O, Bravaccini S, Puccetti M, Tumino R, Bucchi L,

Advertisement

International journal of public health 2017 04 19() doi 10.1007/s00038-017-0971-8

Abstract
OBJECTIVES
To report the results of a pilot study for a service for cervical cancer screening and diagnosis in north-western Tanzania.

METHODS
The pilot study was launched in 2012 after a community-level information campaign. Women aged 15-64 years were encouraged to attend the district health centres. Attendees were offered a conventional Pap smear and a visual inspection of the cervix with acetic acid (VIA).

RESULTS
The first 2500 women were evaluated. A total of 164 women (detection rate 70.0/1000) were diagnosed with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical cancer. The performance of VIA was comparable to that of Pap smear. The district of residence, a history of untreated sexually transmitted disease, an HIV-negative status (inverse association), and parity were independently associated with the detected prevalence of disease. The probability of invasive versus preinvasive disease was lower in HIV-positive women and in women practicing breast self-examination.

CONCLUSIONS
The diagnostic procedure had an acceptable level of quality. Factors associated with the detected prevalence of disease will allow for a more targeted promotion of the service. Cervical screening should be coordinated with sexually transmitted disease and HIV infection control activities.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

17 + five =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]