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Sexual Identity Disclosure and Awareness of HIV Prevention Methods Among Black Men Who Have Sex With Men.

Sexual Identity Disclosure and Awareness of HIV Prevention Methods Among Black Men Who Have Sex With Men.
Author Information (click to view)

Watson RJ, Fish JN, Allen A, Eaton L,


Watson RJ, Fish JN, Allen A, Eaton L, (click to view)

Watson RJ, Fish JN, Allen A, Eaton L,

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Journal of sex research 2017 10 12() 1-9 doi 10.1080/00224499.2017.1375452

Abstract

Black men who have sex with men (BMSM) are disproportionately affected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, yet we know little about how HIV-negative BMSM of different sexual orientations access HIV prevention strategies. Identity development, minority stress, and disclosure theories suggest that for people of different sexual orientations, disclosure of sexual identity may be related to health behaviors. We performed a latent class analysis on a sample of 650 BMSM (Mage = 33.78, SD = 11.44) from Atlanta, Georgia, to explore whether sexual orientation, disclosure of sexual identity, and relationship status were related to HIV prevention strategies, including awareness of PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) and PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) and frequency of HIV testing. We found three distinct BMSM classes referred to as (1) closeted bisexuals, (2) sexual identity managers, and (3) gay, out, and open; all classes primarily engaged in casual sex. Classes differed in their awareness and access to HIV prevention strategies. The closeted bisexual class was least aware of and least likely to access HIV prevention. Findings have important implications for future research, namely the consideration of sexual identity and disclosure among BMSM. With this knowledge, we may be able to engage BMSM in HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention services.

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