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Sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes.

Sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes.
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Muraki I, Wada H, Tanigawa T,


Muraki I, Wada H, Tanigawa T, (click to view)

Muraki I, Wada H, Tanigawa T,

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Journal of diabetes investigation 2018 02 17() doi 10.1111/jdi.12823
Abstract

The aim of this review is to clarify the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and type 2 diabetes, and discuss the therapeutic role of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in type 2 diabetes. OSA patients are more likely than non-OSA populations to develop type 2 diabetes while more than half of patients with type 2 diabetes suffer from OSA. Similarly to the Western countries, in the East Asian population, the association between these two disorders has also been reported. CPAP is the primary treatment for OSA, but the effect of CPAP on comorbid diabetes has not been established. CPAP improved glucose metabolism determined by the oral glucose tolerance test in OSA patients, and several studies have shown that CPAP improves insulin resistance, particularly in obese populations undergoing long-term CPAP. Diabetes is associated with other sleep-related manifestations as well, such as snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness. Snoring is associated with the development of diabetes, and excessive daytime sleepiness appears to modify insulin resistance. Well-designed studies are needed to clarify the therapeutic effect of CPAP on diabetes. Since both diabetes and OSA lead to cardiovascular disease, clinicians and healthcare professionals should be aware of the association between diabetes and OSA, and should take CPAP and health-related behaviors into consideration when treating patients with diabetes and/or OSA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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